Boise Valley Fly Fishers
 
 
Since 1971

 

BVFF EDUCATION EVENTS


  • 30 Aug 2022 7:56 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    By Dave Shuldes

    As I write this I have just put the finishing touches on flies for my annual trip above 8,000 feet in Central Idaho. I love the staging of gear nearly as much as the trip itself. There’s only one shot at getting the kit right for a week in the wilderness, so every detail is double-checked. My fishing won’t be measured by numbers. A few photos of some exceptional fish along with the adventure and the camaraderie of a safe backpacking trip with friends will be all I need.


    In addition to taking care of my gear and my friends, one of my goals will be to appreciate and take care of the fish found in these alpine lakes. Just like my camping list, this involves details. When a beautiful alpine lakes’ brookie, cutthroat, golden, grayling or rainbow comes to hand, I’ll show my appreciation for the fish by using these guidelines:

    • I’ll use barbless hooks.
    • I’ll keep my hands wet while handling the fish and will cradle it rather than squeezing it.
    • I won’t touch the fish and will keep it from touching dry surfaces like rocks and grass.
    • I’ll keep the fish in the water as long as possible, minimizing air exposure and handling time.

    “Take only photos, leave only footprints” as backpackers say. Photos are a key part of my passion for fly fishing and the wilderness. But I won’t appear in any of those fish pictures… I’ll save that for a group shot at the camp. The fish itself is the main event. I don’t stress every fish with the photo process - I will limit that to the memorable ones. Some fish are extraordinary, not only by size but also by vibrancy and markings. I’m looking for colors, spots and details to appear in the frame. Flared fins and a submerged head are a bonus. Ideally the fish will be swimming in the water on the end of the line (to me it’s worth the risk of losing the fish before the photo is taken). I’ll have everything set up on my camera long before the fish is hooked. Holding the fish by the line with the hook still in its mouth in shallow water, I’ll shoot a rapid succession of random shots. I can crop, discard and edit later on. I’ll minimize the photo session time with any one fish and release it quickly after one series of shots.

    For river fishing, I’ll add use of a net to my fish handling and take special care to release quickly when water temps are warm. Using the net as a “live well” to hold the fish while it’s reviving is a great opportunity to frame a vibrant swimming photo.

    A fish mortality study by R.A. Ferguson and B.L. Tufts considered time a trout was held out of the water. Their findings showed that fish released and kept in the water had a mortality rate of 12%. Fish lifted from the water for 30 seconds had a 38% mortality rate. 72% of the fish held out of water for a full minute died. All research has its flaws, but holding fish out of the water can be harmful if not lethal. I would like to think that most fish handled in the manner above can potentially spawn and be available to another angler in the future. Taking care of the fish in this way is a great fit with our BVFF Angling Code.

    I absolutely love what wilderness fly fishing adds to my enjoyment of life. I am so grateful for the wildlife resources we have to enjoy in Idaho. In return I want to appreciate the life involved and treat it well. Tight lines everyone!


  • 27 Aug 2022 3:48 PM | Troy Pearse (Administrator)

    It was a peaceful morning at 7,000 feet. The air was cool from the night before and the hot cup of coffee hit the spot. While enjoying the view over the lake something kept dropping on my head. At first I thought it was pine needles from the tree next to me, but then I saw black ants crawling on the bill of my hat. I shook them off and sat back down to finish my coffee, but more ants rained down and I decided to move further from the tree to avoid having to fish them out of my cuppa joe.

    That afternoon while fishing the outlet of the lake I had Yellowstone Cutts come up and look at my flys (hoppers, caddis, and misc attractors) but no takers. Remembering the ant rain-storm from the morning I added a #16 black ant as a dropper to my hopper and BAM! First cast a cutthroat took the ant. I fished back through the water I had previously fish and had 6 more cutts come to the ant.

    A good reminder, that it is that time of year when an ant pattern should be your go-to fly. Here is a “Bug Corner” article that ran in last year’s Hackle Bender newsletter.

    FALL ANTS

    When I look back at my September fishing logs I can’t help but notice how many fish have been caught on ants. Usually the ant was a dropper to a bigger fly like a hopper or an October caddis but instead of trout going for those BIG MAC MEALS they wanted the itty-bitty ant—and they often moved a long way to get them!

    Ants are terrestrials so it is productive to fish them close to shore and especially near downed trees. Ant patterns are small and not very visible so they work well as a dropper to a larger fly. And it’s OK if they sink a bit because ants often get drowned and trout are on the lookout for them subsurface. In fact, sometimes a sunken ant will out-fish one on the surface.

    I usually fish a black or cinnamon color ant in size #16 or #18 but some people swear by a size #20 ant. For years I used a traditional dubbed body ant with black hackle for legs but the last few years I’ve been using a foam-cylinder ant. They are easy to tie, float well and have a bright indicator built in that make them much more visible on the water. It’s also good to have some flying ants in your box as you never know when that hatch is going to happen, and Egan’s Bionic Ant is worth adding to your box.

    Fly Patterns

    Foam Cylinder Ant

    Bionic Ant


  • 25 Aug 2022 2:47 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    January 6-7, 2023

    For 18 years, Boise Valley Fly Fishers has proudly presented this two-day event. Over 2500 fly fishers from throughout the western region of the United States attend. Proceeds are used to support fly fishing education and conservation programs throughout Idaho and Eastern Oregon.

    Exhibitors will showcase all the latest gear including the latest rods, reels, fly tying equipment, guide services, artwork and more.

    Fly tyers from all over the west will demonstrate their skills in small group settings where attendees can ask questions and learn.

    Experts from around the country will give demonstrate the latest fishing techniques for different fish species, where to fish, and much more.

    More information: https://www.idahoflyfishingexpo.com

  • 28 May 2022 6:04 PM | James Kazakoff (Administrator)


    ID F&G recently held "Lets Go Fishing" day at Eagle Island State Park on May 28, 2022 as part of its Trailer Education program. The agency partnered with local radio stations for a ‘free fishing fiesta’ Memorial Day weekend to kick off the fishing season in Idaho. BVFF members Troy Pearse and Jon Fishback were there to provide casting instruction and information about BVFF.

    Memorial Day marks the unofficial opener to fishing season in Idaho. This was a community event to introduce English and Spanish-speaking residents of southwest Idaho to fishing and recreational opportunities at the area’s state parks.

       

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